Edo Tokyo & Japanese Culture Tour with Nationally Licensed Guide

This tour is for people who is keen to learn history and culture of Tokyo. With a nationally licensed and experienced guide, getting in to the Imperial Palace and exploring old towns around Edo-Tokyo Museum will make you feel truly satisfied.

In short, Edo is the old name for Tokyo. The Edo period, sometimes also referred to as the Tokugawa period, is a 250-year period of isolation between 1603 and 1868. Your guide assist you to dive into the prosperity and cultural flourishing time when the country took on some of its most essential characteristics.

Let us know what you would like to experience, and we will customize a six-hour tour that’s best for you!

Note*1: Please select your must-see spots from a list in the tour information to create your customized itinerary.
Note*2: The Nationally-licensed Tour Guide-Interpreter certification is issued by the Japanese government requires a good knowledge and understanding of Japanese culture and history.
* Duration: 6 hours
* Starts: Marunouchi, Japan
* Trip Category: Cultural & Theme Tours >> Cultural Tours




This tour is for people who is keen to learn history and culture of Tokyo. With a nationally licensed and experienced guide, getting in to the Imperial Palace and exploring old towns around Edo-Tokyo Museum will make you feel truly satisfied.

In short, Edo is the old name for Tokyo. The Edo period, sometimes also referred to as the Tokugawa period, is a 250-year period of isolation between 1603 and 1868. Your guide assist you to dive into the prosperity and cultural flourishing time when the country took on some of its most essential characteristics.

Let us know what you would like to experience, and we will customize a six-hour tour that’s best for you!

Note*1: Please select your must-see spots from a list in the tour information to create your customized itinerary.
Note*2: The Nationally-licensed Tour Guide-Interpreter certification is issued by the Japanese government requires a good knowledge and understanding of Japanese culture and history.

Itinerary
This is a typical itinerary for this product

Stop At: Imperial Palace, 1-1 Chiyoda, Chiyoda 100-8111 Tokyo Prefecture

The current Imperial Palace (皇居, Kōkyo) is located on the former site of Edo Castle, a large park area surrounded by moats and massive stone walls in the center of Tokyo, a short walk from Tokyo Station. It is the residence of Japan’s Imperial Family.

Edo Castle used to be the seat of the Tokugawa shogun who ruled Japan from 1603 until 1867. In 1868, the shogunate was overthrown, and the country’s capital and Imperial Residence were moved from Kyoto to Tokyo. In 1888 construction of a new Imperial Palace was completed. The palace was once destroyed during World War Two, and rebuilt in the same style, afterwards.

Duration: 1 hour

Pass By: Edo-Tokyo Museum, 1-4-1 Yokoami, Sumida 130-0015 Tokyo Prefecture

The Edo-Tokyo Museum (江戸東京博物館, Edo Tōkyō Hakubutsukan) is housed in a unique looking building in the Ryogoku district. The museum’s permanent exhibition vividly illustrates the past of Tokyo (known as Edo until 1869) through its exhibits and covers many features of the capital from the Edo Period to relatively recent decades.

In an interactive way, visitors are able to experience and learn about various aspects of earlier Tokyo, such as the way of life of people, Edo Period architecture, cultural heritage, political climate, commercial situation and more. Through numerous models of towns, figurines and life-sized figures, the museum makes it interesting to find out about how towns were constructed in the past.

Pass By: Nihonbashi, Nihonbashi, Chuo, Tokyo, Tokyo Prefecture, Kanto

Nihonbashi was once the starting point of five main roads that ran through and across Japan and prospered as the center of Edo, the present-day Tokyo. Nihonbashi still has an old and traditional Japan’s feel to it while continues to develop as a modern town. One of its charms is an easy access from Tokyo station; it only takes less than 10-minute walk to get to Nihonbashi.

Stop At: Ryogoku Kokugikan, 1-3-28 Yokoami, Sumida 130-0015 Tokyo Prefecture

Ryogoku (両国, Ryōgoku) is a district of Tokyo where the sumo stadium, many sumo stables, chanko restaurants and other sumo related attractions can be found. It is the center of the sumo world. Sumo events have been staged in this area for a long time, but until the beginning of the 20th century, sumo tournaments were held outdoors at shrines and temples.

In 1909, the first permanent sumo hall was built in the Ryogoku area. Today’s sumo stadium, the current Kokugikan, is the fourth built in Tokyo and has been in use since 1985. It seats over 10,000 visitors and hosts three of the six annual sumo tournaments (in January, May and September).

Duration: 30 minutes

Stop At: The Sumida Hokusai Museum, 2-7-2 Kamezawa, Sumida 130-0014 Tokyo Prefecture

The Sumida Hokusai Museum (すみだ北斎美術館, Sumida Hokusai Bijutsukan) is a museum dedicated to the ukiyo-e artist Katsushika Hokusai, commonly referred to as Hokusai. His most well-known works include The Great Wave off Kanagawa and Red Fuji, which are a couple of prints from the collection Thirty-Six Views of Mount Fuji. The museum was opened in November 2016 in Tokyo’s Sumida Ward where Hokusai was born and where he spent most of his life.

Duration: 30 minutes

Pass By: Sumida River, Tokyo Prefecture

The Sumida River (Sumidagawa) is one of Tokyo’s main rivers, and the most familiar Tokyo river to visitors. The Sumida River starts directly north of Tokyo, then out eastward through eastern Tokyo.